Hate at the push of a button

Philip Kreißel, Julia Ebner, Alexander Urban, Jakob Guhl, 2018

This joint report by ISD and German campaign group, ‘Ich Bin Hier’, maps the rise and nature of far-right hate speech in Germany. It combines quantitative data-analysis from Facebook comment sections with insights gained from ethnographic research in far-right chat groups.

The report demonstrates that a relatively small portion of highly active users are responsible for a disproportionate amount of hateful far-right online content. The findings strongly suggest that far-right trolls use sophisticated media strategies to spread hate campaigns online. A small, but well-coordinated network of far-right accounts are therefore able to mainstream their ideas by influencing media reporting, and in turn, public debate by creating a false impression of representing a wider portion of society than they actually do.

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La pandémie de COVID-19: terreau fertile de la haine en ligne

Ce rapport s’intéresse à la corrélation entre la pandémie et propagation du discours haineux en ligne. En s’appuyant sur la méthodologie de la Cartographie de la Haine en ligne, l’ISD a opéré une analyse en détail du discours anti-arabe/magrébin, anti-musulman, anti-asiatique et anti-refugié/migrant. Cette étude fait le constat que la pandémie a alimenté des discours visant à stigmatiser certaines communautés minoritaires en France.

Public Figures, Public Rage: Candidate abuse on social media

This report presents the findings of our research into the scale of online abuse targeting Congressional candidates in the 2020 US election. We found that women and candidates from an ethnic minority background are more likely to receive abusive content on mainstream social media platforms. It provides recommendations and next steps which should be taken by technology companies and policymakers to protect candidates who are more likely to be targeted online and receive abusive content.