GCTF Countering Violent Extremism Toolkit

The Toolkit provides a practical and user-friendly guide for policy-makers and governmental experts on good governmental practices, case studies, and references to existing international and regional initiatives and practices in preventing and countering violent extremism and terrorism online. The Toolkit further outlines means to efficiently and sustainably collaborate with information and communication technology (ICT) companies and civil society organizations based on shared responsibilities, while ensuring that any policy is respectful of human rights and the rule of law, and is context-specific and gender-sensitive.

The Toolkit was developed in collaboration with the Geneva Centre for Security Sector Governance (DCAF) and the Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD) during the course of a research phase and two expert meetings workshops held in The Hague, the Netherlands, and in Tirana, Albania in March and May 2019 respectively.

The target audience of this Policy Toolkit is GCTF Members as well as GCTF Key Partners and any other governments interested in preventing and countering violent extremism and terrorism online.

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