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The Business of Hate: Bankrolling Bigotry in Germany and the Online Funding of Hate Groups

The Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD) and the Global Disinformation Index (GDI) have published a new study which shows how 17 known German far right groups and actors allegedly use online funding services to fund their activities. These services include companies like Mastercard, Paypal, Giropay and WooCommerce). More than half of these online funding services have Terms of Service (ToS) that should prohibit their use by such sites.

Gaming and Extremism: The Extreme Right on Twitch

ISD discovered that content which expresses support for extreme right wing ideologies can be discovered on Twitch with relative ease, for example, through the practice of “Omegle Redpilling.” However, these videos are probably better considered as sporadic examples rather than representative of the systemic use of Twitch by the extreme right for radicalisation and coordination.

Hatescape: An In-Depth Analysis of Extremism and Hate Speech on TikTok

This research examined how TikTok is used to promote white supremacist conspiracy theories, produce weapons manufacturing advice, glorify extremists, terrorists, fascists and dictators, direct targeted harassment against minorities and produce content that denies that violent events like genocides ever happened. Furthermore, the report includes analysis of how users seek to evade takedowns by TikTok.

An Online Environmental Scan of Right-Wing Extremism in Canada

This report documents the second-year findings of a study by researchers at ISD which tracks the online ecosystems used by right-wing extremists (RWE) in Canada. This work is delivered in the context of a larger study into Canadian RWE, led by a team of researchers at Ontario Tech University (OTU) in partnership with Michigan State University and the University of New Brunswick.

Gaming and Extremism: The Extreme Right on DLive

ISD found that a wide range of extremist influencers, including British white nationalists, use DLive as part of a broader strategy to broadcast extreme right ideology online, yet they appeared to have an ambivalent relationship with the platform overall. There were also signs that efforts by DLive to implement more robust terms of service appear to be having an impact on extremist activity.

Gaming and Extremism: The Extreme Right on Discord

ISD found that the Discord platform primarily acts as a hub for extreme right-wing socialising and community building, as well as gamified harassment through ‘raids.’ Our analysis suggests that Discord provides a safe space for young online users, who on average were 15 years old, to share ideological material and explore extremist movements.

Gaming and Extremism: The Extreme Right on Steam

In this chapter we analyse 45 interconnected Steam community groups associated with the extreme right. We found Steam to host the most diverse subgroups of extreme right communities, ranging from public servers set up for supporters of far-right political parties to violent neo-Nazi groups, some active on the platform since 2016.

Gamers Who Hate: An Introduction to ISD’s Gaming and Extremism Series

This scoping project explores the use of the gaming-related platforms Steam, Discord, Twitch and DLive by the extreme right, concentrating specifically on the UK. This work is presented in our Gaming and Extremism series, providing a series of snapshot analyses designed to identify key trends and patterns which can provide the groundwork for future analysis. This report is an executive summary and serves as an introduction to the series.

The networks and narratives of anti-refugee disinformation in Europe

This report provides a snapshot of the different online communities involved in the promotion of hate and disinformation targeting refugees and the migration sector in 2020. It looks at networks of accounts in Greek, German and English language, and provides an overview of the narratives employed in anti-refugee disinformation and the dynamics which drive this activity online.