Young Digital Leaders Impact Report

LUCIE PARKER, IRIS BOYER, COOPER GATEWOOD, OCTOBER 2018

This report presents the findings from our Young Digital Leaders project which was designed to equip young people aged between 13-16 years old in Italy, Romania and Sweden with the skills they need to be safe, powerful and effective online citizens in the 21st century, and to explore new ways of teaching digital citizenship in formal educational settings in Europe. The project pioneered a unique, collaborative partnership model between students, teachers, parents and local civil society organisations.

The project, piloted by Google and ISD, used trained local facilitators to deliver one-day workshops covering a range of social challenges relating to the online world, including fake news and propaganda, echo chambers, emotional manipulation and hate speech.

This report demonstrates the effectiveness of parent education and citizenship and the need for digital resilience training and education to be embedded within national curricula and delivered regularly over a longer period of time to a wider age group.

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Hosting the ‘Holohoax’: A Snapshot of Holocaust Denial Across Social Media

This briefing paper examines the extent to which Holocaust denial content is readily accessible across Facebook, Twitter, Reddit and YouTube. This paper also demonstrates how appropriately applied content moderation policies can be effective in denying dangerous conspiracy theorists a public platform by examining how Holocaust denial content has decreased significantly in the past year on YouTube.

Developing a Civil Society Response to Online Manipulation

This document presents a vision for a pan-civil societal response to online manipulation. In part, it argues, this will come down to capability: building a pooled detection capacity to function as a transparent, public interest alter­native to those built by the tech giants. In part, it will require new organisational philosophies and forms of co-operation, and in part new approaches to funding and support.

The 101 of Disinformation Detection

Disinformation can threaten the activities, objectives and individuals associated with civil society groups and their work. This toolkit lays out an approach that organisations can undertake to begin to track online disinformation on subjects that they care about. The process is intended to have a very low barrier to entry, with each stage achievable using either over-the-counter or free-to-use social media analysis tools.